EARTH HOUR

SHOW GRATITUDE FOR GAIA

From the high peaks of the mountains
To the fertile valley floors
The sparkling rivers that flow
Into the vast oceans and shores
Open wide your arms and embrace
As you let your deeply held connection
To Mamma Gaia
Hold space
Nourish and entwine your Gaian soul of
Creative expression
To make you whole
Then let self-exploration heal
And connect your celestial pole
Become the embodiment of your inner fire
The fabric of all life on Earth – Mama Gaia

ON SATURDAY 24 MARCH 2018, MILLIONS OF PEOPLE FROM AROUND THE GLOBE CAME TOGETHER FOR EARTH HOUR. FROM COLOMBIA TO INDONESIA TO AUSTRALIA, EARTH HOUR 2018 MOBILIZED PEOPLE TO CONNECT2EARTH AND SHARE WHAT NATURE MEANS TO THEM, IN THE PLACES THEY LIVE IN AND CARE ABOUT.

Our home has some of the most iconic and breathtaking natural landscapes and wildlife in the world. But just like many of the natural wonders across our blue-green planet, we’re facing massive threats to our biodiversity due to climate change.

That’s why millions of people in over 180 countries turned off their lights for Earth Hour as a symbolic gesture to show the need for stronger action.

But how did we fair on a local level? Did our hometowns and communities take part or just laugh at the thought that this movement is ridiculous and won’t make a difference?

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Let’s take a look at the facts about climate change.

If average global temperatures rise above 2°C, it is expected that most coral systems like the Great Barrier Reef will not survive. A temperature rise of 3°C will see the effective destruction of coral reefs such as Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and the Ningaloo Reef.

With 4°C of warming, the most extraordinary heatwaves experienced today will become the norm and a new class of heatwaves, of magnitudes never experienced before, will occur regularly.

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Wheat growing is strongly affected by rainfall and temperature. As well as reduced production, we may also see lower dietary value with lower levels of protein and important micronutrients like zinc and iron.

With a temperature rise of 3°C, irrigated agriculture in the Murray-Darling Basin (which produces ⅓ of national food supply) is likely to lose half its annual output.

Snow cover is projected to reduce to zero in most Australian locations that currently experience a significant snow season if warming reaches 2.9°C above 1990 levels by 2050

Warming of 3°C will mean 55% loss of Eucalyptus core habitat.

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So as you can see even these few significant issues raise concerns – there are many more.

Earth Hour and the importance of learning about the accelerating climate change and the staggering biodiversity loss which threaten our planet is something we all should take part in and do our best to protect wherever we live. Be it a small remote town or suburbia.

Afterall this is our planet.

 

 


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